La Trobe University

The Latrobe University Bundoora campus brief called for the conversion of underutilised rooms and corridor ‘eddy spaces’ into informal student focused hubs, available 24/7 with access to the wireless network. The installations occurred in the Donald Whitehead Building, Education & Humanities Corridor and Social Science Corridors.

Project Details

Architects
Baldasso Cortese

Award
Commendation Category 5 - An Education Initiative or a Design Solution for an Innovative Program

Address
Kingsbury Drive Bundoora Melbourne, Victoria 3083

Submitter
Hal Cutting

Cost
1,195,800

Photographer
Jackie Winkelman Photography

Project Overview

The Latrobe University Bundoora campus brief called for the conversion of underutilised rooms and corridor ‘eddy spaces’ into informal student focused hubs, available 24/7 with access to the wireless network. These spaces were the first of their kind on campus and as such, decisions were made in early workshops to trial these spaces and learn from them. 

The Donald Whitehead Building called for the creation of a flexible learning commons, sanitary facilities and an undercover outdoor learning area. 
The design investigates the opportunity to create a variety of zones within the room that foster individual and group learning. A series of three fixed alcove banquets at one end provides intimate learning for groups of 4-6 students; whilst the opposite end has a linear banquet with ottomans and tables that encourages individual learning or group collaboration. The central floor space is left as a flexible reconfigurable space. The room continues the graphic theme of the learning commons project with the use of strong colours in a striated zigzagging pattern that unifies the space. 
An outdoor learning terrace connects the learning commons to the landscape. 

The Education & Humanities Corridor called for four flexible learning spaces, two inboard and two with views out into the landscape. The design needed to ensure light penetration is maintained deep into the dark and lifeless corridor. The strategy was to bring colour, pattern, texture and graphics into the corridor through the use of materials that wrap up the wall and on to the ceiling. A striated pattern adds visual texture, with some striations becoming pin boards or glass writing boards on the wall. Timber battens provide a physical yet visually permeable screen that ensures light penetration is not hindered to the inboard spaces.

The two Social Science Corridors called for flexible seating in narrow corridors. The solution was to create custom sculptural banquet seating units which snake up and down to create a variety of seating positions. The wall is painted in the faculty colour to remind one of location and a simple series of rubber panels to connect the floor to the ceiling also provide pin space.

The Latrobe University Bundoora campus brief called for the conversion of underutilised rooms and corridor ‘eddy spaces’ into informal student focused hubs, available 24/7 with access to the wireless network. These spaces were the first of their kind on campus and as such, decisions were made in early workshops to trial these spaces and learn from them.

The Donald Whitehead Building called for the creation of a flexible learning commons, sanitary facilities and an undercover outdoor learning area.
The design investigates the opportunity to create a variety of zones within the room that foster individual and group learning. A series of three fixed alcove banquets at one end provides intimate learning for groups of 4-6 students; whilst the opposite end has a linear banquet with ottomans and tables that encourages individual learning or group collaboration. The central floor space is left as a flexible reconfigurable space. The room continues the graphic theme of the learning commons project with the use of strong colours in a striated zigzagging pattern that unifies the space.
An outdoor learning terrace connects the learning commons to the landscape.

The Education & Humanities Corridor called for four flexible learning spaces, two inboard and two with views out into the landscape. The design needed to ensure light penetration is maintained deep into the dark and lifeless corridor. The strategy was to bring colour, pattern, texture and graphics into the corridor through the use of materials that wrap up the wall and on to the ceiling. A striated pattern adds visual texture, with some striations becoming pin boards or glass writing boards on the wall. Timber battens provide a physical yet visually permeable screen that ensures light penetration is not hindered to the inboard spaces.

The two Social Science Corridors called for flexible seating in narrow corridors. The solution was to create custom sculptural banquet seating units which snake up and down to create a variety of seating positions. The wall is painted in the faculty colour to remind one of location and a simple series of rubber panels to connect the floor to the ceiling also provide pin space.

This page last updated: Sunday 2 December 2012