Marshland School

Project Details

Architects
Stephenson&Turner/Hayball

Address
11 T Korari Street Marshland, 8051 Christchurch New Zealand

Cost
10m

Project Overview

Following extensive damage to the existing school following the Christchurch earthquakes, Marshland School has been rebuilt on a new site. This new school provides an excellent environment with an exciting range of learning settings while being sensitive to Marshland’s history and identity.

Marshland School has been rebuilt on a new site. This follows extensive damage to the existing school following the Christchurch earthquakes. This new school provides an excellent environment with an exciting range of learning settings while being sensitive Marshland’s history and identity. The design results from a strong collaboration process between two architecture practices, Hayball and Stephenson&Turner, the school and ministry.

While being close to Christchurch, Marshland is a country school at heart with a history dating back to the 19th century. The new school is entirely located within one building uniting the school and promoting collaborative, innovative learning spaces. The admin, café, library and multipurpose hall have been intentionally placed at the entrance becoming the Central Hub of the school. Caregivers are encouraged to come and ‘grab a coffee’ in the café enabling them to feel engaged with the school. The Central Hub has also been designed for easy access for the community to use the facilities on the weekend.

Learning Hubs are located either side of the Central Hub, these spaces are designed to respond to the ‘Blended Learning’ pedagogy of the school. Each of these hubs are defined by a central gathering space, where the whole group can meet before breaking off into smaller groups and take advantage of the range of smaller targeted activity spaces.

The external walkway, which runs along the western edge of the building, allows connectivity between admin and the learning spaces. It also includes COLA spaces (Covered Outdoor Learning Areas) which encourages outdoor learning and provides a greater connection between indoor and outdoor. This aspect of the design relates to the aspirations of the school as sport and outdoor learning is a major focus for the school.

The design incorporates passive environmental design principles within the ventilation and natural daylighting saving money and the environment at no extra cost. The completed school can cater for 400 students with room for an extension that could mean the school could fit up to 650 students, future proofing the school for the high population growth in the area.

This page last updated: Tuesday 24 May 2016